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What’s a LLC?

A limited liability company, or LLC, is a business structure in the United States that combines the pass-through taxation of a partnership or sole proprietorship with the limited liability of a corporation.

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LLC Basics

A limited liability company (LLC) is a business structure in the United States that combines the characteristics of a corporation with the flexibility of a sole proprietorship or partnership. An LLC is not a corporation, so it is not subject to corporate income tax. Instead, it is taxed as a partnership or sole proprietorship.

Define a LLC

A LLC is a business structure that can combine the pass-through taxation of a partnership or sole proprietorship with the limited liability of a corporation.3 min read

A LLC is a business structure that can combine the pass-through taxation of a partnership or sole proprietorship with the limited liability of a corporation. A LLC is not a corporation, and it is not a partnership. A LLC is its own legal entity, and it can be taxed as either an S corporation or a C corporation.

The biggest advantage of creating a LLC is that it offers personal liability protection to its owners. If the LLC is sued, the owners will not be held personally liable for any debts or judgments against the LLC. This is not the case with sole proprietorships and partnerships, where the owners are personally liable for all debts and judgments against the business.

Another advantage of creating a LLC is that it can help you to save on taxes. If you choose to be taxed as an S corporation, then your LLC will only be taxed on its net income. This means that you will not have to pay personal income taxes on any money that you make from the LLC. If you choose to be taxed as a C corporation, then your LLC will be subject to corporate income taxes. However, you may also be able to take advantage of certain tax deductions and credits that are available to corporations.

The disadvantages of creating a LLC include the fact that it can be more expensive and time-consuming to set up than other business structures, and you will also have to file annual reports and pay annual fees in most states. In addition, if your LLC does not have enough members, it may be taxed as a partnership rather than as an S corporation or C corporation.

Understand the benefits of a LLC

A limited liability company, or LLC, is a business structure in the United States whereby business owners can enjoy personal liability protection while still being taxed as a partnership or sole proprietor.3 min read

If you’re starting a small business, you may be wondering if forming a limited liability company (LLC) is the right move. After all, LLCs are often discussed as the best of both worlds when it comes to business ownership — offering owners both personal liability protection and pass-through taxation (more on that later).

There are definitely some advantages to forming an LLC over other types of businesses structures, such as sole proprietorships and partnerships. But there are also some disadvantages to keep in mind.

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In this article, we’ll touch on some of the key pros and cons of starting an LLC so you can make an informed decision about what’s best for your business.

Find out if a LLC is the right choice for your business

There are many different business structures to choose from when starting a business, and each has its own advantages and disadvantages. One popular choice is a limited liability company (LLC). If you’re thinking of starting an LLC, it’s important to understand what they are and how they work.

An LLC is a type of business structure that offers personal liability protection and flexible tax options. LLCs are popular among small businesses because they are relatively easy to set up and maintain. Keep reading to learn more about LLCs, including how they compare to other business structures.

What is an LLC?
An LLC is a business structure that combines the features of a corporation and a partnership. Like corporations, LLCs offer personal liability protection for their owners. This means that if the LLC is sued or incurs debts, the owners’ personal assets are protected. However, like partnerships, LLCs are not subject to corporate income taxes. Instead, LLC profits and losses “pass through” to the owners, who report them on their individual tax returns.

How do LLCs work?
LLCs can be either member-managed or manager-managed. In a member-managed LLC, all members take an active role in running the business. In a manager-managed LLC, one or more members take on the role of manager, while the other members remain passive investors.

Like corporations, LLCs have “articles of organization” that specify the company’s purpose, members, managers (if any), and other basic information. Most states also require LLCs to file annual reports and pay annual fees, although these requirements vary from state to state.
Do I need an attorney to set up an LLC?
While you can technically set up an LLC yourself, it’s advisable to consult with an attorney beforehand. This is because there are many complex legal issues involved in starting and running an LLC, and it’s easy to make mistakes if you’re not familiar with the law.

Additionally, some states require that you use an attorney for certain steps in the process of forming an IDLable=”off”>C (e.g., filing your articles of organization). Even if your state doesn’t have this requirement, working with an attorney can save you time and hassle in the long run

How to Set Up a LLC

A Limited Liability Company, or LLC, is a business structure in the United States that can combine the benefits of a corporation with the flexibility of a partnership. Setting up a LLC is a relatively simple process that can be done online in a matter of minutes. In this article, we’ll walk you through the steps of how to set up a LLC.

Choose a business name

Your LLC’s name must end with an LLC designation. For example, “XYZ Company, LLC” or “XYZ Gardeners, Limited Liability Company.”

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You can choose any name you want as long as it isn’t already in use and doesn’t violate trademark law. You can check for existing businesses in your state by searching your state’s business registry. You can also do a federal trademark search to see if your desired name is protected.

If you choose a name that’s too similar to an existing business, you could be sued for trademark infringement. To avoid this, you may want to consider hiring a lawyer or a trademark search service to help you pick a unique and distinguishable name for your LLC.

File the Articles of Organization

A Limited Liability Company (LLC) is a business structure allowed by state statute. LLCs are popular because, similar to a corporation, owners have limited personal liability for the debts and actions of the LLC. Other features of LLCs are more like a partnership, providing management flexibility and the benefit of pass-through taxation.

LLCs can be formed by filing Articles of Organization with your Secretary of State’s office. While the process and paperwork vary by state, most states have an online filing system that makes it relatively easy to set up an LLC. You will need to provide some basic information about your LLC, such as the name and address, as well as the names of the members or managers of the LLC. You will also need to designate a registered agent for your LLC in most states. A registered agent is an individual or business that agrees to receive legal papers on behalf of your LLC in case you are sued.

In some states, you may need to file additional paperwork or take additional steps in order for your LLC to be fully formed. For example, you may need to publish a notice in a local newspaper or complete a Certificate of Good Standing from your state before you can open a business bank account. Once you have completed all the necessary paperwork and taken any required steps, your LLC will be officially formed in your state!

Appoint a Registered Agent

A limited liability company (LLC) is a business structure allowed by state statute. Each state may use different regulations, and you should check with your state if you are interested in starting an LLC. Owners of an LLC are not personally liable for the debts and obligations of the LLC.
 
An LLC can be formed by one or more individuals, corporations, other LLCs and foreign entities. There is no maximum number of members for an LLC, although most states do not allow an LLC to form with only one member. An LLC must have a designated registered agent in the state where it is formed. The registered agent will accept service of process on behalf of the LLC.

An LLC can be managed by its members or by managers that are appointed by the members. Most states do not require LLCs to have a Board of Directors, and the members can direct the management of the company without having meetings or taking minutes.

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The articles of organization for an LLC are filed with the state where the company will be located. The articles must include the name and address of the company’s registered agent, the names and addresses of the members or managers, and a statement that indicates that the company will be managed by its members or managers. The articles can also include other information about the company, but this is not required in most states

Operating a LLC

LLC stands for limited liability company. A limited liability company is a business structure allowed by state statute. LLCs are popular because, similar to a corporation, they offer limited liability protection to their owners. Other features of LLCs include pass-through taxation and the ability to choose your corporate structure. Let’s look at some of the ins and outs of LLCs.

Create an Operating Agreement

An operating agreement is a legally binding contract that outlines the ownership and operating procedures of your LLC. This document is not required in all states, but it’s a good idea to have one anyway. It will help you avoid disagreements between members and keep your business running smoothly.

Operating agreements should include:
-The names and contact information of all LLC members
-The percentage of ownership interest held by each member
-Each member’s rights and duties
-How profits and losses will be distributed
-How new members can be added to the LLC
-What happens if a member leaves the LLC
-When and how the LLC will be dissolved

Comply with LLC Requirements

In order to stay in good standing with the state, you must comply with all LLC requirements. These include holding annual meetings, maintaining records, and electing a board of directors. You must also file an annual report and pay any required fees. If you do not comply with these requirements, your LLC may be subject to fines or even dissolved.

To stay in good standing, you must:
-Hold annual meetings
-Maintain records
-Elect a board of directors
-File an annual report
-Pay any required fees

Pay Taxes and Fees

All LLCs must file an annual report with their state and pay taxes, just like any other business. Depending on the state, you may have to file additional forms and fees. For example, some states require LLCs to file a statement of information or a notice of foreign qualification.

The amount of taxes and fees your LLC will have to pay depends on a number of factors, including the state in which your LLC is registered and the type of business you’re in. To get an idea of what kind of taxes and fees your LLC will be responsible for, contact your state’s taxation office and small business division.

Here's How To Create An LLC in Just Minutes!

*This applies to Virginia residents too!

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